The Guardian 31 March 2018

Palestinians hold day of mourning after 773 ‘shot with live ammunition’

At least 15 killed when Israeli soldiers open fire during mass demonstrations in Gaza Gaza hospitals, running low on blood and overstretched by the huge number of wounded, were reeling after one of the enclave’s bloodiest days outside of open war, in which Israeli soldiers shot 773 people with live ammunition, according to the ministry of health.Fifteen of the wounded died, said the ministry spokesperson Dr Ashraf al-Qidra. “Most of the dead were aged between 17 and 35 years old,” he said. “The injuries were on the upper part of the body.” He added that the remainder of the wounded, some of whom were in a critical condition, had been “shot with live ammunition”. Continue reading...

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Malala Yousafzai visits hometown for first time since Taliban shooting

Nobel peace prize laureate visited Pakistani town of Mingora, where she was shot by militants in 2012Malala Yousafzai has visited her hometown Mingora for the first time since she was shot on a school bus by a Taliban militant in 2012.Yousafzai and her parents landed in an army helicopter at a cadet school near the Swat Valley town in north-west Pakistan on Saturday morning. Continue reading...

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Foreign Office considers Russian consular access to Yulia Skripal

Announcement regarding daughter of poisoned spy comes amid row over search of Russian aircraft by British authorities The Foreign Office has said it is considering Russia’s request for consular access to Yulia Skripal as a fresh row develops over why British authorities searched a Russian aircraft travelling from Moscow to London on Friday.Russia’s transport ministry said it would demand an official explanation from the UK government for why a Russian Aeroflot passenger plane was searched by authorities at Heathrow on Friday, and threatened “similar actions” against British Airways planes in Russia. Continue reading...

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Fox News host Laura Ingraham takes week off after David Hogg comments

11 companies boycott The Ingraham Angle over Twitter attackNaomi Wadler: the 11-year-old helping lead a protest movementThe Fox News host Laura Ingraham announced late on Friday that she will take the next week off, after 11 advertisers dropped her show over her mockery of a teenage survivor of the Florida school shooting. Related: Florida school shooting survivors march on unfazed by personal attacks Continue reading...

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Sierra Leone begins voting in presidential runoff election

Lower turnout reported amid tight security in election that had been delayed by legal challengePolls have opened in Sierra Leone’s runoff presidential election. Voting is peaceful and the turnout is lower than in the first round on 7 March. Security is tight in the west African nation. Continue reading...

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Lord Sugar deletes Corbyn-Hitler tweet after McDonnell appeal

Apprentice star had posted mocked-up image of Labour leader in car next to Nazi dictatorLord Sugar, the businessman and Apprentice host, has deleted a tweet that depicted Jeremy Corbyn sitting next to Adolf Hitler after criticism from senior Labour figures.The shadow chancellor, John McDonnell, had called on Sugar to “delete and disown” the tweet. Continue reading...

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Catalan academic facing extradition draws record crowdfunding appeal

Clara Ponsatí handed herself in to police in Scotland after Spanish government issued warrant for her arrestThe crowdfunding appeal established to assist the former Catalan minister Professor Clara Ponsatí in her fight with the Spanish government against extradition is believed to have set a new record.Ponsatí was granted bail at Edinburgh sheriff court last Wednesday after the Madrid authorities issued a European Arrest Warrant (EAW) charging her with “violent rebellion” and “misappropriation of public funds”. Continue reading...

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Stephen Hawking: Eddie Redmayne to speak at Cambridge funeral

Service is being held at church near Gonville and Caius College, physicist’s academic home for 52 yearsThe actor Eddie Redmayne, who played Prof Stephen Hawking in The Theory of Everything, has arrived at the University Church of St Mary the Great in Cambridge for Hawking’s funeral. The actor will give a reading at the service. Five hundred friends, colleagues and family are expected to attend the private service, followed by a reception at Trinity College. Continue reading...

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Ex-Uber boss was paid $4m by investor that acquired 17.5% stake

Emil Michael was hired by SoftBank as it invested in Uber following crisis over sexual harassment allegationsA controversial former Uber boss, who was one of the ride-hailing service’s most senior executives when it was engulfed in crisis last year, was paid $4m (£2.8m) in consultancy fees by the venture capital firm brought in to revive the company’s fortunes.Emil Michael received the payment for advice given to the technology investor SoftBank as it acquired a 17.5% stake in Uber at the turn of the year. Continue reading...

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Dita Von Teese: ‘Staying pale takes some effort in LA’

The burlesque dancer, 45, on divorcing Marilyn Manson, collecting lingerie and why she’s actually quite low-maintenanceBurlesque has become a place for an alternative feminist movement. I didn’t ever think I was going to be famous. I just started doing it because it was fun and something cool that nobody else was doing. We get to decide if we want to be objectified. But I recognise that one person’s empowerment can be another person’s degradation.You can only hunt swans if you’re royalty. The pair I have in my living room at home in Los Angeles are my best taxidermy score for sure. I got them on eBay. They’re antique, obviously, in case anyone is freaking out. Continue reading...

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Fresh voices: 50 writers you should read now

Which debut novel should you reach for this spring? Who can map our digital future? Here’s our guide to the most exciting voices in fiction, politics, SF, graphic novels and more Continue reading...

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Cuba Gooding Jr: ‘I had 10 years in the wilderness’

Life was all private jets and limos after his Oscar win. Then came a decade of bad roles and flop films. Now, he’s making up for lost time“Somebody asked me backstage, when I won the Oscar: ‘Did you ever imagine this?’ And I was like, ‘Never in a million years!’ But it was bullshit. It was a lie,” Cuba Gooding Jr admits. “I used to practise my autograph in math class. I would envision myself holding that Oscar above my head. The real success stories are the people who truly believe they are going to be famous, so they mentally prepare. And that’s what I was doing my entire life: preparing for it.”What Gooding hadn’t thought about was what to do next. That night in 1997, he won best supporting actor for his portrayal of footballer Rod Tidwell in Tom Cruise sports drama Jerry Maguire. It was the high point of his career, and his performance was so unforgettably dynamic that Tidwell’s “Show me the money!” catchphrase became part of the language. When Gooding went to pick up the Oscar, it was as if he was still in character. He backflipped and shouted, “I love you!” to his family, God, Tom Cruise and anyone else he could think of. When the background music swelled, rather than cutting him off, it soundtracked a crescendo of gratitude that was both manic and sincere. Both on screen and off, Gooding’s energy shook up the place. The audience gave him a standing ovation. Continue reading...

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‘A silent disaster unfolding’: my life with multiple sclerosis

Playing with my daughter, I noticed my fingers were numb. Then came the memory loss and clumsiness. I thought it was just age, but the doctor had bad news...One January morning in 2014, I lurched upright in bed at about 6am and announced: “I think I’m having a heart attack.” The main audience for this was my five-month-old daughter, Leon, sharing the bed with us, often sleeping sideways and leaving little snow angels in the sheets. Next to her was my wife Sarah, squashed up against the wooden bars of an open-sided cot we’d clamped on to the bed. Leon was not fazed. She sucked her thumb, waiting to see what happened next. Sarah, more used to my cheery opening remarks, propped herself up on her elbows and squinted.“Pain in your arm?” she asked. Continue reading...

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'Never again': how 11-year old Naomi Wadler became a rallying voice of black protest

After making a global impact at the March for Our Lives last weekend, Naomi Wadler and her mother retreated to a beach house. They spoke to the Guardian about activism and gun deathsWhen 11-year-old Naomi Wadler gave a speech at last weekend’s March for Our Lives in Washington about the importance of remembering the lives of black women and girls lost to gun violence, the reaction was intense and immediate. Related: 'Haunting' school shooter drills become the new normal in US schools Continue reading...

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Hand over my social media account to get a US visa? No thank you | Arwa Mahdawi

A state department proposal to ask visitors for their social media identifiers could affect nearly 15 million visa applicants. We can’t let it happen without a fightDonald Trump has done such a good job making America great again that nobody in their right mind wants to visit it any more. Tourism has experienced a so-called Trump Slump; with international visitors decreasing significantly since No 45 took office. In January, the UN World Tourism Organisation said that it expected Spain to replace the US as the world’s second most popular tourism destination in 2018. Now, to be fair to our great leader, he isn’t entirely to blame for the downturn in visitors. The trend began back in 2015 and can be partly attributed to a stronger dollar. However, analysts are generally in agreement that Trump’s divisive rhetoric and obsession with travel bans has done a lot to make international visitors feel unwelcome and decide to go somewhere else on holiday. Continue reading...

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Don’t you just love it when a man explains to you what it means to be a woman?

There is understandable concern about being on the wrong side of history. But I’ll tell you what has never put anyone on the right side of history: shouting women downBy a man-sized margin, my favourite recent news story is the one about two feminists who went to a men-only swimming session in Dulwich, south London, because, as they explained, they now self-identify as men. An elderly gentleman was initially confused. “I told him I was a man and he said, ‘Oh really?’” one woman later told reporters. “It was a very British response.” Other men at the pool were less sanguine, and complained to reception.This protest was announced on Mumsnet, a pleasing hotbed of radical feminism these days, as part of a campaign against proposed changes to the Gender Recognition Act. Currently, anyone who wants to change gender needs to have lived in their chosen gender for two years and been diagnosed with gender dysphoria. If the changes go through, anyone will be able to declare they are a man or woman, regardless of whether they have made any actual changes to their lifestyle or body. This is known as “self-identification” and the reactions have borne out that Margaret Atwood line, “Men are afraid women will laugh at them while women are afraid men will kill them.” Men have largely ignored the issue, until it comes charging into their changing room, while a lot of women have argued that predatory men could now come into female-only spaces unchallenged. Continue reading...

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Republicans rigged our democracy. Here's how Democrats can fight back | David Faris

Republicans have been using the Constitution’s flaws to wage a one-sided war against their political opponents. It’s time for Democrats to respondDonald Trump wasn’t elected because Democrats lost a policy fight in 2016. What Democrats did was lose a procedural fight that has been going on since the early 1990s, when Republicans began waging a relentless, brutal, and completely one-sided war, systematically using their lawmaking power to disadvantage their adversaries in elections and political mobilization. Gerrymandering, the Citizens United atrocity that declared money is speech, blocking US supreme court nominations and obstructing legislation are some of the Republican party’s tactics. Depraved, racist voter ID laws that obviously target people who are likely to vote Democratic, and the cruel way that many states prevent current or former felons from voting are others. Continue reading...

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Manchester United v Swansea, West Ham v Southampton and more – live!

Premier League updates, plus more from around EuropeAnd feel free to email Barry or tweet him @bglendenning 2.50pm BST Our on-the-whistle report from Selhurst Park, wqhere Liverpool came from behind to beat Crystal Palace in somewhat controversial circumstances. Related: Mo Salah earns Liverpool victory as Sadio Mané courts controversy 2.40pm BST Stewards by the pitch and in the stands at the London Stadium. Barriers up near the directors' box. And an attacking Southampton team. Mark Hughes clearly reckons West Ham are vulnerable. Continue reading...

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South Africa v Australia: fourth Test, day two – live!

Updates from the final match of the series in JohannesburgSouth Africa 488 all out (Markram 152, Cummins 5-83)David Warner regrets ball tampering but offers no clarificationFeel free to email [email protected] 2.49pm BST 15th over: Australia 50-3 (Khawaja 26, S Marsh 3) “Although there is an undeniable pleasure in seeing the Aussies receiving a sound thrashing (yes, I’m counting chickens) it almost feels unfair in the circumstances,” says Richard Mansell. “I’d rather an SA victory was really earned, so I’d prefer that Australia not wholly collapse but manage to make a game of it.” 2.49pm BST Keshav Maharaj replaces Philander. Khawaja offers no stroke to his final delivery and survives a big shout for LBW. There was a lot of guesswork involved for the umpire - but du Plessis decides to review. This is close. It turned a long way from the rough and hit Khawaja on the back leg. Height is the issue - and Hawkeye suggests it was just bouncing over the stumps. Khawaja survives and South Africa lose a review. Continue reading...

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Mo Salah earns Liverpool victory as Sadio Mané courts controversy

It was a frantic and contentious contest and ultimately one of huge satisfaction for Liverpool as they recovered from going 1-0 down to secure a victory that shores up their place in the Premier League top four and provides ideal preparation ahead of Wednesday’s Champions League contest with Manchester City.To nobody’s great surprise, it was Mohamed Salah who struck Liverpool’s later winner, a calm and precise finish from Andy Robertson’s cross on 84 minutes that took the Egyptian’s tally to 39 goals in what continues to be a remarkable debut season. In the broader sense for the visitors, this triumph displayed their capacity to carve out a win even when they are not playing well, which was the case here, and will only deepen Crystal Palace’s sense of regret after they had taken the lead through Luka Milivojevic’s 13 minute penalty. Continue reading...

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Stuart Broad burst puts England in command before New Zealand dig in

England 307; New Zealand 192-6Broad: ‘That’s the best rhythm I’ve been in for years’BJ Watling and Colin de Grandhomme, the Little and Large of Kiwi cricket, mounted a fine recovery on the second day at the Hagley Oval just when England sensed that everything was falling into place after the most frustrating of winters. After the removal of Kane Williamson 10 minutes after lunch, New Zealand were 36 for five in response to England’s 307. Stuart Broad, having used that new Kookaburra so effectively – how dare anyone suggest removing it from his grasp? – had taken three wickets in his opening spell, while Jimmy Anderson had snaffled the other two. An end to England’s dismal run overseas was on the horizon. Continue reading...

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Plogging: the fitness craze that's sweeping the streets

It’s time to embrace the Scandinavian trend for picking up litter while jogging – even if the word ‘plogging’ is a bit rubbishFitness crazes, like much else, are born of lexical innovation: “spinning” for riding stationary bicycles, or HIIT (high-intensity interval training) for running fast then slow. The latest happy innovation, from Scandinavia by way of France and Thailand, is “plogging”: jogging while picking up litter.Until the 1960s, jogging meant walking or riding a horse at a slow, jerky pace Continue reading...

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Peter Kay announces second charity screening of Car Share

New screening announced by comedian after tickets for event in Blackpool sold out in minutesA second charity screening featuring new episodes of Peter Kay’s television show Car Share has been added after tickets to the first event sold out in minutes. Related: Peter Kay cancels UK and Ireland tour over 'family circumstances' Continue reading...

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Toni Braxton: 'I tried marijuana once and got really paranoid'

The R&B star has survived bankruptcy (twice!), the wrath of Oprah and Whitney’s dating tips. As she returns with a new album, she talks about her turbulent life and career Related: Toni Braxton: Sex and Cigarettes review – exquisitely anguished R&B Ask Toni Braxton for a memory that encapsulates her 90s imperial phase and she’ll ignore that decade’s five Grammys, 25m albums sold (10m for 1993’s self-titled debut, 15m for 1996’s Secrets) and the 11-week US No 1 reign of windswept mega-ballad Un-Break My Heart. She’ll neglect to mention the friendships with Prince and Whitney Houston, or the fact that her influence means she recently performed at Rihanna’s 30th birthday party (slow jam Breathe Again is a RiRi favourite). No, the story that sticks in her head is a little less glitzy. One night, she tells me over the phone from New York, she was followed to a restaurant toilet by a group of female fans who, while she was having a quick sit down, tapped on the cubicle wall. “Excuse me, are you Toni Braxton?” they asked. “Can we get your autograph?” “I was like: ‘Can you give me a second?!’” Braxton laughs, her low, husky voice lending the story unwarranted gravitas. Continue reading...

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Civilisations by David Olusoga review – a riposte to European superiority

A subversive response to Kenneth Clark’s series deconstructs the notion of civilisation and charts the effects of greed, hubris and diseaseIn the summer of 1520, towards the end of his life, the great German artist Albrecht Dürer travelled from his home in Nuremberg to the Low Countries, to meet his new patron, the Holy Roman emperor Charles V. At the same time, halfway across the world in the middle of the Americas, the Spanish adventurer Hernán Cortés was carrying out his merciless siege of the Aztec capital, Tenochtitlán. By the time it fell, on 13 August 1521, much of the city lay in ruins, and as many as 100,000 of its inhabitants had already died. Many more were massacred as the victors set about plundering whatever they could lay their hands on. When the first shipment of spoils arrived in Brussels, Dürer was one of those who flocked to examine it. He was blown away. “All the days of my life,” he wrote in his diary, “I have seen nothing that rejoiced my heart so much as these things, for I saw amongst them wonderful works of art, and I marvelled at the subtle ingenuity of men in foreign lands. Indeed I cannot express all that I thought there.”This vignette of cross-global inspiration is one of the highlights of David Olusoga’s new book, a richly illustrated companion volume to the two episodes he is presenting in the BBC’s new Civilisations. In outline, its format is fairly Eurocentric and conventional. Despite all the fuss that has been made about the TV project’s updating of Kenneth Clark’s 1969 series Civilisation, Olusoga’s own approach is framed in terms that would hardly have shocked audiences 50 years ago: the first half of the book considers contact between civilisations in “the European Age of Discovery” (from the 15th to the 18th centuries), while the second looks at the impact of industrialisation on the art and artists of the 19th century. Continue reading...

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How to make the perfect chocolate souffle

This is a great showstopper for Easter, and it’s nowhere near as hard as some recipes make outRegardless of religion, the one thing that unites us as nation at Easter is our boundless appetite for chocolate eggs – we spend £220m a year on the things. If you’re out to impress, however, turn those eggs into a chocolate souffle instead: richly flavoured, yet featherlight, it’s the perfect end to an Easter feast and, crucially, far easier to pull off than its fearsome reputation suggests. Not that your guests need to know that, of course. Continue reading...

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‘We’re never going to bed’: children rewrite the house rules

Sweets for breakfast, pillow fights on demand, and no tidying up... what happened when three families let the kids call the shots for a week?‘The house has the airless discombobulation of a student house in the 90s, the day after a big night out on ecstasy’: Decca AitkenheadThree hours in, I feel weightless, almost giddy. I’m lying on the sofa with my boys, eating chocolate, watching telly, and it is no exaggeration to say that I am having the time of my life. For the first time in eight and a half years, I am not in charge. This exotic sensation of relaxation is completely unfamiliar – and yet stirs a distant memory of who I used to be. Continue reading...

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Yotam Ottolenghi’s chicken recipes

From oven-baked ‘fried’ chicken to coronation chicken bake, these child-friendly recipes will unite the whole family at mealtimesIn my house, where the children forever negotiate what they’ll be given at mealtimes while the grownups keep pledging (in vain, obviously), “I’m not getting into this conversation”, chicken is the one food that unifies the family ranks. It appears on our table in endless configurations, the simple traybake being the most popular with cooks and little mouths alike. Just like those other two childhood favourites, pasta and pancakes, it’s convenient, versatile, delicious and never the bone of any contention. Continue reading...

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The secret to… avoiding the same old arguments with your partner

Rather than focusing on what annoys you, make a big deal out of it when your partner does something positiveFocus on what is working. If you are keen to exit a cycle of negativity, create a list of the lovely things your partner does, no matter how small, that you can be thankful for. Rather than focusing on what annoys you, elevate the small details of your partner’s thoughtfulness. Better still, make a big deal out of it when your partner does something positive. It will motivate them towards acts of kindness.Be vulnerable. Often a criticism holds a veiled wish. When you say, “You’re always at football with your friends,” what you may mean is, “I wish you were with me.” Try asking for what you want and sitting with the possibility that you won’t get it. Continue reading...

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TV presenter Steph McGovern: how I eat

The face of BBC Breakfast has to get up at 3.30am, so what kickstarts her day?I get up at 3.30am. We’re on air from 6am, so if I’m in the studio, I’ll have eggs at around 7am from the canteen – scrambled or poached, occasionally with a slice of brown toast. If I’m on the road, though, say, a factory visit, it’ll be a bacon butty with the team. Which is great, a real treat. But it’s all downhill from there. Continue reading...

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I’m depressed about the vanilla sex I have with my wife | Ask Annalisa Barbieri

It’s very much all about you and what you’re not getting, says Annalisa Barbieri. But she seems to have the power and it might be that when you’re about to leave that she listensMy wife and I are both in our early 50s. I love her, find her attractive and like her as a person, but we have a fundamental difficulty: we can’t talk about any kind of problem or anything personal. Or, rather, she can’t. If things are going well, we get on OK, but if there is a problem we just argue. There is no meeting of minds, no talking through something. So either nothing gets said or we have big, horrible arguments. The hardest part for me is regarding sex. We can’t talk about this at all. I feel that we don’t have a sexual relationship. Every three weeks or so we might have sex, but I am always frustrated by it. This started 12 years ago. When we do have sex, it is always the same and she always initiates it because if I do she just won’t respond. When I started to become tempted to look elsewhere I resolved to do all I could to try to improve things. Continue reading...

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'Haunting' school shooter drills become the new normal in US schools

‘How is this going to help us?’ a teacher asks as versions of this ritual are now stitched into the fabric of the American educational systemNaomi Wadler: the 11-year-old helping lead a protest movementThe gunshots came from upstairs, pop-pop-pop, and Lindsay Aikman’s heart thumped faster and faster. The school’s public address system announced an active shooter. Related: Florida school shooting survivors march on unfazed by personal attacks Continue reading...

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Six arrested after £1.3m in cannabis seized in Northern Ireland

Three pensioners released on bail while three suspects in custody after County Down raidThree pensioners were among six people arrested after cannabis estimated to be worth £1.3m was seized in Northern Ireland. Continue reading...

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A 'hellish world': the mental health crisis in America's prisons

In America, jails and prisons have become the nation’s de facto mental healthcare providers – and the results are chillingIn One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, Ken Kesey describes two kinds of patients in the psychiatric hospital where the story is set: Acutes (“because the doctors figure them still sick enough to be fixed”) and Chronics (who are “in for good, the staff concedes”).When Kristopher Rodriguez, a 31-year-old man from Florida, first went into the US criminal justice system in 2008, it seemed like he would have been classified as an Acute; now nearly a decade later, he would almost certainly qualify as a Chronic. Continue reading...

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The big picture: Easter Sunday, 1958

The late Observer photographer Jane Bown turns her natural eye for studies of children to a moment of seasonal longingJane Bown took this picture for the Observer’s Easter Sunday paper exactly 60 years ago. It shared the front page with a couple of stories. One reported on the unseasonable holiday weather, the 1958 equivalent of the “beast from the east”, with a forecast that included “snow, sleet, rain, ice, flooding and fog”.The other dwelt on the previous day’s Aldermaston peace marches. The Observer’s celebrated feature writer John Gale had evidently been dispatched in search of some “colour” and his report delivered: “There was a young girl among those carrying the large banner of the Twickenham branch of CND, (a painted group of father in dark suit and mother in blue, and small child in yellow in her arms) and she had very pink legs below her green jeans…” Continue reading...

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Original Observer photography

Authors, actors, singers and whistleblowers feature in this showcase of the best photography commissioned by the Observer in March 2018 Continue reading...

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The 20 photographs of the week

The March for Our Lives, Black Lives Matter and the Kemerovo disaster – the week captured by the world’s best photojournalists Continue reading...

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