News : NPR 7 April 2018

Teachers Protest; Discipline Disparities Persist; Trans Students In The Classroom

Teachers in Oklahoma and Kentucky protested this week. A new report from a government watchdog shows persisting discipline disparities in America's classrooms.

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He Was Oklahoma's Teacher Of The Year, Then Moved To Texas For Better Pay. Now What?

Oklahoma's teacher pay has been low for so long that many experienced educators have left, including the 2016 Teacher of the Year. We wanted to ask how his home state looks now from afar.

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Caught Between The Military And Militants, Pakistan's Pashtuns Fight For Rights

A new rights movement is led by an activist from South Waziristan, a front line in the war on terrorism. Manzoor Pashteen has attracted thousands of followers in his nonviolent push for reform.

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Germany Car Crash Leaves Several Injured

A vehicle crashed into the town Muenster in Germany injuring a number of people.

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2 Dead After Car Drives Into Crowd In Germany

In addition to the two fatalities, the driver injured about 20 people in the western city of Muenster, police say, then killed himself.

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Lula Da Silva, Brazil's Beloved Ex-President, Surrenders After Standoff

On Saturday, supporters chanted "Resist!" as they surrounded a union headquarters where Lula holed up in his last hours of freedom. He's been sentenced to 12 years in prison over corruption charges.

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15 Dead In Canadian Junior Hockey Team Bus Crash

Fourteen others are injured after a collision in the western province of Saskatchewan. Authorities have not released the names and ages of the victims, as condolences poured in from across the nation.

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'Bucket Brigade' Volunteers Still Digging California Homes Out After Mudslides

More than two months since a massive and deadly debris flow slammed the community of Montecito, Calif., hundreds of volunteers are working to carve paths to front doors and dig out kitchens.

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When Robots Milk Cows, Farm Families Taste Freedom

On a growing number of dairy farms, cows, not people, decide when they need to be milked. Robots can do the job day or night. For some farm families, the robots free them from rigid milking schedules.

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Louisiana Issues Quarantine To Control Invasive Marsh-Killing Bug

Officials say more than 200,000 acres of marshland cane have been affected. State Agriculture and Forestry Commissioner Mike Strain worries the bug could mutate and start ruining agricultural crops.

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Analysis: In Trump's Twitter Feed, A Tale Of Sound And Fury

Trump's tweets delight supporters who say they find him honest, funny and refreshing. But his tweets distract and dismay his detractors, alienate many of his allies and misdirect much of the media.

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What We Mean When We Talk About 'Suburban Women Voters'

"Suburban women" have been a political fixation for decades. "We're really talking about ... relatively educated and affluent whites," said one Republican strategist.

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The Russia Investigations: On The Hunt For Duffel Bags Full Of Cash

Investigators for Justice Department special counsel Robert Mueller head out to greet arriving Russian oligarchs while others are now under sanctions. And Mr. Zuckerberg comes to #ThisTown.

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Medical Marijuana's 'Catch-22': Limits On Research Hinder Patient Relief

Suffering Americans seek medical marijuana as an alternative to opioids and other powerful pharmaceuticals. Though legal in 29 states, doctors say the lack of strong data make it hard to recommend.

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Could You Fight Off Worms? Depends On Your Gut Microbes

Nearly 25 percent of people are infected with worms. New research suggests that gut microbes may be able to help in waging war against the parasites.

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