BGR 6 April 2018

Our favorite wireless keyboard never needs to be charged

Everyone has a wireless keyboard these days because they’re so much more convenient. Well, there’s actually one way that they’re far less convenient than wired keyboards: you have to charge them or swap out the batteries every so often. If you want the best of both worlds, however, there is a simple solution. Check out the Logitech K750 Wireless Solar Keyboard, which is available for both Windows and Mac computers. It has a solar panel at the top so it’s constantly charging as you use it, and the best part is the fact that it doesn’t need sunlight to recharge. Any light bulbs overhead or any desk lamp will do the trick, and you’ll never have to worry about batteries or plugging your keyboard into the wall again. Here’s some more info from the product page: Solar-powered keyboard: No battery hassles - any light source keeps your keyboard charged for at least three months in total darkness Only 1/3-inch thick: Ultra-thin design adds sleek style to your workspace Feel-good typing: Logitech-only concave key cap design for faster, quieter, more comfortable typing Powerful 2.4 GHz wireless: Enjoy a reliable connection using a tiny Logitech Unifying receiver that stays in your computer System Requirements-Windows XP, Windows Vista , Windows 7, Windows 8, Windows 10, macOS. Light source from sunlight and/or indoor lighting

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We finally know why SpaceX had to mysteriously cut its latest livestream short

Back on March 30th, SpaceX sent yet another of its Falcon 9 rockets skyward, delivering a payload of 10 satellites into orbit for communications company Iridium. Everything went pretty much according to plan — aside from SpaceX failing to catch the nosecone piece it was aiming for — but one thing stuck out to viewers of the company's launch live stream. Before all of the separations and deployments were completed, SpaceX had to cut its stream short, citing the fact that it didn't have permission from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to broadcast the rest of the mission. As one would expect, this caused a lot of theories to flood forth. SpaceX has been forced to cut its broadcasts short in the past, but normally only when they are delivering a government payload into orbit. NOAA issued a statement saying that it was indeed responsible for SpaceX halting its stream halfway through, and pointed to a licensing guideline as the reason. As CNET reports, this licensing fiasco seems to have come out of absolutely nowhere. NOAA has had the restriction in place for some time, and it requires anyone who wants to broadcast from space, and show images of Earth, to have permission to do so. However, it's a law that's been sparsely enforced since its inception, and SpaceX has done plenty of space launch broadcasts without worrying about a license in the past. So, what's different now? "The National and Commercial Space Program Act requires a commercial remote sensing license for companies having the capacity to take an image of Earth while on orbit," NOAA explained in its statement. "Now that launch companies are putting video cameras on stage 2 rockets that reach an on-orbit status, all such launches will be held to the requirements of the law and its conditions." NOAA says that the law exists because broadcasting from space has significant national security implications, and it needs to make sure no vital information is compromised when a company decided to start streaming from orbit. Going forward, it seems as though SpaceX's popularity has given the law new life, and you can bet that all future launches will need NOAA broadcasting clearance.

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Today’s best deals: $20 AirPods rivals, DVR for cord cutters, Ghost camera drone, $10 headphones, more

We're closing out the week with one of our best daily deals roundups in recent memory. Highlights include everyone's favorite truly wireless AirPods rivals for just $19.99 when you use the coupon code 50ROKMB2 at checkout, the lowest price ever on the popular Alexa enabled ecobee3 Lite Smart Thermostat, a killer deal of the day on a Ghost camera drone, more than 30% off the amazing DVR for cord cutters that can beam live network TV to multiple devices for free, a few bucks off a portable iPhone charger that can also wirelessly charge your Apple Watch, an Echo Dot rival for just $20, $70 off one of the best compact tripods, the lowest price ever on the most popular portable speaker we've covered, Spigen Bluetooth headphones for just $9.99, and plenty more. Check out all of today's best bargains below.

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Oh look, there are ways to design all-screen Android phones that aren’t iPhone X copycats

In an unprecedented coincidence, nearly every noteworthy Android vendor around the world has seemingly enlisted the services of the same smartphone design consultancy. How embarrassing! We weren't even aware that Apple offered design consulting services to rival phone makers, but that would certainly explain why nearly two dozen different Android phones with Apple's iPhone X display design have either been released or will soon be released. Oh, wait. How silly of us. There is another explanation as to why so many phones look like Apple's iPhone X this year. Maybe it's because all these companies are content shamelessly copying Apple's designs instead of coming up with their own? We've seen companies dodge questions when asked why they copied the iPhone X, and we've seen companies try to explain their iPhone ripoffs away by blaming the notch on the supply chain. We've even seen delusional Android fans make the laughable claim that all these companies are actually copying a phone from Essential, not the iPhone X. As it turns out, however, there are ways to make a smartphone with an "all-screen" design that isn't a blatant iPhone X copycat. Some people enjoy variety when it comes to design choice. In fact, some might say that's one of the great things about Android. But apparently choice is a thing of the past for many Android vendors these days, because copying Apple's latest iPhone designs is all that matters. We don't have to show you that embarrassing image with 20 different iPhone X copycats in one picture again, because we've already beaten that horse to death. 2018 is the year of the notch, and we have Apple's design team and Android companies' lack of originality to thank. On the iPhone X, the notch makes sense for two important reasons. First, it allowed Apple to make the thin bezel surrounding the iPhone X's display completely uniform all the way around, thanks to a brilliant feat of engineering that hides the display controller behind the bottom of the screen instead of underneath it. Second, it leaves room for the complex cluster of cameras and sensors that Apple calls TrueDepth. Unsurprisingly, not a single copycat from an Android phone maker has either of these key features. 3D facial recognition systems and bendable OLED displays are complex and expensive, and Android vendors are only concerned with copying the general appearance of the iPhone X. Of course, there are plenty of ways to accomplish the pseudo all-screen design that Apple and other smartphone companies are chasing right now. Samsung uses nearly edgeless sides and narrow bezels above and below the screen on its Galaxy S9 and Galaxy S9+, for example. And now, there's another new phone with a creative solution to the all-screen design quandary. A Chinese Android phone maker you've never heard of called Doogee is one of the many companies that made an iPhone X ripoff. It's called the Doogee V, and you'll probably never see one in your life. But unlike other companies, Doogee is actively working on other ways to achieve an all-screen design without copying Apple's notch. A prototype of one such phone, the Doogee Mix 4, was just featured in a video on YouTube. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UWz4LPyoSw4 You know what? This design is actually pretty awesome. Maybe I'm biased because one of my favorite smartphones of all time is the Nokia N95 that had a similar screen-sliding mechanism, but I really like it. When you use the phone most of the time, all you see is display. Then when it comes time to make a phone call or snap a selfie, you can simply slide up the back of the phone. Kudos to you, Doogee. Perhaps other Android phone makers will find inspiration and realize that copying Apple's designs isn't the only answer. Or maybe they'll just wait until next year, when Apple will reportedly release iPhones with a new design they can copy.

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Facebook says users would have to pay to remove targeted ads

A few weeks removed from the revelation that Cambridge Analytica improperly acquired data from upwards of 87 million Facebook users, the social networking giant is still in full-on damage control mode. Alongside a slew of apologies, Mark Zuckerberg this week sat down for an interview on The Ezra Klein Show where he flat-out conceded that it may take Facebook a few years to "dig through this hole." "I wish I could solve all these issues in three months or six months," Zuckerberg said, "but I just think the reality is that solving some of these questions is just going to take a longer period of time." Of course, compounding matters is that new mini-scandals seem to be sprouting up with each passing day. Just yesterday, for example, word surfaced that Facebook had a program -- which has since been put on hiatus -- designed to align patient data from hospitals with corresponding user profiles on the site. And while the underlying goal of the program was to improve patient care, news of the nascent program couldn't have come at a worse time for the company. With Facebook still on the defensive, Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg recently sat down for an interview with NBC News that originally aired on the Today show. As you might expect, Sandberg echoed previous statements from other Facebook executives regarding the Cambridge Analytica fiasco. "We were given assurances by them years ago that they deleted the data," Sandberg said. "We should have followed up. That's on us. We are trying to do a forensic audit to find out what they have." One of the more interesting tidbits from Sandberg's interview centered on Facebook's advertising arm. Indeed, Facebook's ability to provide advertisers with hyper-targeted demographic information is the reason why the company's platform was such an attractive target for Cambridge Analytica and others in the first place. Not surprisingly, the current controversy engulfing Facebook won't do much to limit the ads users see on a day-to-day basis. When asked point-blank if Facebook would ever provide users with an ability to opt out of targeted advertising, Sandberg didn't mince words. "We don't have an opt-out at the highest level. That would be a paid product." When subsequently asked if Facebook would have a business if the company didn't collect user information, Sandberg eventually stated the obvious: "Our service depends on your data."

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These $14 earbuds claim to help you sleep better – and they actually work for a lot of people

People who have trouble sleeping are always on the lookout for a magical cure. Well, we have good news and bad news. The bad news is that there obvious is no magical cure; no sleep solution is going to work for everyone. But the good news is there are some solutions out there that really do help some people, and the MAXROCK Noise Isolating Sleep Earplugs can be counted among them. We’ve covered them a few times here on the site, and people say they really work. They’re extremely comfortable so they’re perfect to fall asleep with, and you can listen to any soothing music or sounds you want. Here are some bullet points from the product page: Light weight and Comfortable – super light soft design can't feel them in ear even sleeping on the side, total squishy silicone incredible comfortable for 24hours wear , work well for white noise or other sleep apps to help to improve the speed of falling asleep and increase deep sleep. Ergonomic Double Layer Design for most ear size: made of two size eartips fit entirely in ear for most size ear canals according to plug it in certain deep of your ear, and the soft and flexible silicone ear house enable it to fit and stay in ear perfectly avoiding falling out. Flexible Earplugs Noise Isolating Design-- In-ear earplug design effectively drown/block out background noise , perfect to block out the snoring, living-room TV sound , office noise and roommate move…and protect your listening in loud noisy environment Patented 5mm Speaker Clear& Crisp Audio- Super mini speaker to offer the best in-ear snug experience ,still have good performance for treble and mids without distortion, little lack of bass considering for the silicone house and 5mm speaker, main attraction to make sure the soft comfy for long time wear. Build in Microphone& Bonus Zipper Carry Case-- in-line microphone easy to take call and Control&adjust the songs; matched durable zipper case to keep the earplugs sleep earphones ,three months no hassle return and replace.

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New video shows a Tesla in Autopilot mode almost crash into a highway barrier

Late last month, a Model X careened into a highway divider whereupon the battery pack on Tesla's electric SUV caught on fire. Tragically, the driver behind the wheel of the Model X did not survive the accident. While details surrounding the crash are still forthcoming, Tesla last week confirmed that the car's Autopilot feature was turned on at the time of the crash. As the company noted in a March 30 blog post: In the moments before the collision, which occurred at 9:27 a.m. on Friday, March 23rd, Autopilot was engaged with the adaptive cruise control follow-distance set to minimum. The driver had received several visual and one audible hands-on warning earlier in the drive and the driver’s hands were not detected on the wheel for six seconds prior to the collision. The driver had about five seconds and 150 meters of unobstructed view of the concrete divider with the crushed crash attenuator, but the vehicle logs show that no action was taken. Of course, many were quick to question why the vehicle's Autopilot feature -- with 5 seconds and 150 meters to spare -- didn't implement any type of defensive action on its own. Tackling this issue, a Tesla owner in Chicago recently took his Tesla for a drive and noted that when faced with a similar intersection, his car almost crashed as well. What's more, another Tesla owner went one step further and took his car for a spin on the same stretch of road as the aforementioned fatal accident and encountered similar behavior from the car's Autopilot feature. Now yet another video has emerged which provides us with perhaps our crispest look yet as to what might be going on. Originally posted to the Tesla subreddit this week, you can see the Tesla almost hurl itself into the highway divider, prompting the driver to quickly assume control of the car. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TIUU1xNqI8w Interestingly, the driver notes that this type of behavior on Autopilot didn't manifest until relatively recent software updates. "Previous autopilot versions didn't do this," the driver noted. "10.4 and 12 do this 90% of the time. I didn't post it until I got .12 and it did it a few times in case it was a bug in 10.4." As to what's going on, it appears that the Tesla is simply trying to center itself, mistaking the lines surrounding the barrier for a wide line. For what it's worth, Tesla issued a statement to Jalopnik this week noting that the Autopilot feature is not designed to relieve a driver of all responsibility. Autopilot does not, as ABC 7’s reporting suggests, make a Tesla an autonomous car or allow a driver to abdicate responsibility. To review it as such reflects a misrepresentation of our system and is exactly the kind of misinformation that threatens to harm consumer safety. We have been very clear that Autopilot is a driver assistance system that requires the driver to pay attention to the road at all times, and it has been found by NHTSA to reduce accident rates by 40%. It would be highly unfortunate if news stories like this influenced people to not use a system that adds to safety.

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Newsflash: There is at least one Facebook user whose privacy is a priority

Facebook has been playing fast and loose with its users' private data since it first launched a targeted advertising program. Every so often, the lucrative strategy backfires when a new, often gaping holes are found in the way the company guards its users' info. There have been dozens of examples over the company's long history, but the most recent may be the most scandalous: A shady firm of "political consultants" secretly harvested data belonging to as many as 87 million Facebook users without their knowledge, and then used that data to influence the 2016 presidential election. This is indeed a massive scandal for Facebook, and the company will be in damage control mode for many months to come before it finally blows over (yes, of course it will eventually blow over). In the meantime, fun new tidbits about how Facebook handles user data continue to emerge on an almost daily basis — which isn't surprising now that reporters have caught a scent. The latest revelation concerns one particular Facebook user, whose privacy appears to actually be a priority for the company. We've said it before and we'll say it again: Facebook is an advertising company. That's how Facebook makes its money. Facebook doesn't charge end users for a product because end users are the product. Facebook builds a profile on each individual user based on every single piece of data it can collect on the Facebook site, in the Facebook app, and even sometimes around the web thanks to tracking cookies. It then uses that profile to target advertisements that are relevant to each user's interests and history. It's a brilliant and lucrative strategy similar to the one used by Google, but Facebook is often far less careful than Google with the way it protects all the user data it collects. The Cambridge Analytica scandal is the latest reminder of that fact. But as it turns out, there is in fact one user whose privacy Facebook has gone the extra mile to protect. In fact, this user's privacy is so important that Facebook actually went into individual users' Facebook accounts and tampered with their Messenger inboxes. Who is this mysterious user whose privacy is so important? Why it's none other than CEO Mark Zuckerberg. In a post early Friday morning, TechCrunch reported that multiple users found old Facebook Messenger texts sent to them by Zuckerberg had mysteriously gone missing. Oddly, their halves of the conversations were left untouched, making it appear as though they were having chats with no one. When confronted, Facebook confirmed to the site that it had indeed deleted messages sent by Mark Zuckerberg using Facebook Messenger. "After Sony Pictures’ emails were hacked in 2014 we made a number of changes to protect our executives’ communications," a company spokesperson told TechCrunch in a statement. "These included limiting the retention period for Mark’s messages in Messenger. We did so in full compliance with our legal obligations to preserve messages." As the report notes, Facebook never disclosed to anyone that it had accessed users' historical Messenger conversations and deleted messages from users' inboxes without their knowledge. The reporter who penned the story contacted Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg using the Messenger app to ask if he thought tamper with users' inboxes might constitute a breach of trust. Not surprisingly, he received no response — or perhaps Zuckerberg did reply, but Facebook deleted his messages before they were seen.

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